Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB)

Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB)

Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) term is used for the tuberculosis (TB) bacillus which is resistant to the two strongest members of anti-TB (anti tuberculosis), Isoniazid and Rifampicin. The bacillus resistant to one of these two drugs is not considered in this group. The tuberculosis bacillus may be resistant to any other drug. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) occurs because of the TB bacillus being resistant since antibiotic treatment is interrupted and the drugs are not completely enough to kill the bacteria. When the patients stop taking antibiotics because they feel better and their complaints decrease, when they forget taking the medicines and the medicines are not enough for the patient, Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) may occur. This tuberculosis type may easily infect from a patient to a healthy person as the normal tuberculosis.
According to WHO (world health organization), 81,000 patients with tuberculosis (TB) do not respond to the tuberculosis treatment in Europe, and in most of the countries, this disease cannot be truly diagnosed. Tuberculosis is mostly common in east Europe, especially in Russia, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan, and London is the city in which this disease is mostly seen in west Europe. World Health Organization prepared a plan to fight Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in 53 countries in Europe and middle Asia. This plan is including development of diagnosis and increase of the access to the treatment. It is believed that 120,000 patients will be treated and recover from Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB).
The patients with Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) can only be treated with the drugs with high side effects. This treatment requires a long time around 2 years. Expensive medicines in second tiers are used in this treatment duration. Surgery may be needed for the treatment of these patients.